Thursday, April 16, 2009

BELFAST, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Titanic.

Transportation Museum.  

There is a splendid transportation museum at Belfast, with full-size carriages and trains, and a model of the Titanic. Big exhibit. When we drove through the city, there were political symbols, and fists, and bombed out places. Banks transferring big canvas locked bags to armored cars had soldiers with machine guns guarding. We moved along smartly.

The Titanic: the exhibit and models of this ship, constructed here in Belfast, offered to its First Class passengers this last meal, according to the Financial Times, this by way of update June 11-12, 2011: see http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/6507080c-9175-11e0-b1ea-00144feab49a.html#axzz1UpRXV9sq
See also http://www.titanicandco.com/menu.htmlhttp://www.food.com/recipe/titanic-1st-class-menu-consomm-olga-191094 (for the Consomme Olga)

There are sites that just give the actual Titanic recipes, but we include later versions also

Course 1: hors d'oeuvres and oysters

Course 2:  Consomme Olga; cream of barley

Course 3:  Salmon, poached, with sauce mousseline, see http://www.suite101.com/content/mousseline-sauce-thick-and-luscious-a89013; cucumbers

Course 4:  Filet Mignon, Lili style, see http://www.cookeryonline.com/RECIPES%20HTML/Meat%20Dishes/Filets%20Mignons%20Lili.html. Think artichoke hearts, madeira, gooseliver paste, truffle

Course 5:  Lamb with mint sauce; roast duckling with applesauce, sirloin of beef chateau, see http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/wbkirOH42DOCp1iBi8LFYA?select=75tph-bwvXaKr-kEQFCviQ, green peas and creamed carrots, rice (boiled) potatoes Parmentier http://www.cookitsimply.com/recipe-0010-01540j.html and is that really just boiled with butter and parsley scattered?  and boiled new

Course 6:  Punch Romaine, http://www.food.com/recipe/titanics-1st-class-menu-punch-romaine-191154 (champagne, wine, orange juice, rum)

Course 7:  Roast squab, see http://articles.boston.com/2006-04-19/ae/29242115_1_squab-oven-and-roast-pan and cress (look like sprouts, or is it just watercress? see http://completewellbeing.com/article/garden-cress-packed-with-power/)

Course 8: Cold asparagus with vinaigrette

Course 9:  Goose liver paste and celery

Course 10:  Waldorf pudding, exact recipe unknown, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_pudding, but many claimants; peaches in Chartreuse jelly (this is probably like a jell-o shot, see http://www.etailersdigest.com/celebrate/refresh/shooters.htm - Chartreuse is a liqueur, see St. Bruno at http://www.cocktailatlas.com/Chartreuse_Liqueur/Char-truth.htm); chocolate and vanilla eclairs, and French ice cream.  French means a custardy base, we think, see http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/french_vanilla_ice_cream/

There.

After Belfast, we went down the peninsula rather than the mainland side toward Dublin, because we saw a ferry marking on the map. Rule:  If you see a ferry sign, you have to take it. Ended up at Downpatrick.

Red Hand of Ulster 
What is the source of the image, the red hand of Ulster.

Find the Red Hand of Ulster, at http://travelpostersonline.com/.

In Belfast neighborhoods, we saw the Red Hand of Ulster on walls, posters.  In 1015 BC, some say 1500 BC, Ui Niall, or Hugh O'Neill was coming to claim Ulster when it appeared that a rival chieftain would get their on his ship first.  So Ua Niall hacked off his hand and hurled it to short, being the first to claim the land.   See http://www.oneill-family.org/RHOU.html/

Millennia later, protestants claimed the symbol for their claim to a birthright there, the Red Hand of Ulster, as a British land.  Here is one: fair use thumbnail from www://cain.ulst.ac.uk

Read legends of Hebrew roots for the Red Hand, at http://www.johnpratt.com/.../  Thumbnails are supposed to be fair use, but we haven't the energy or funds to dispute a site's removal of even that.

Look up the picture of the Zerah Red Hand, Old Testament roots, is from that site.  Do an Images search.

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